Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2017, Page: 71-76
In-vitro Antimicrobial Properties and Phytochemical Constituents of Anthocleista djalonensis Leaf Extracts
Ijeoma Solomon Okoro, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria
Sampson Dominic Umoh, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria; Department of Chemistry, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana
John Vershima Anyam, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria
Manasseh Msugh-Ter Manyi, Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria
Cynthia Adegbe, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria
Received: Aug. 21, 2017;       Accepted: Sep. 18, 2017;       Published: Nov. 20, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.jddmc.20170305.12      View  1730      Downloads  82
Abstract
This study investigated the claims of traditional practitioners in the use of Anthocleista djalonensis for the treatment of various diseases and infections in Benue State, Nigeria. The leaves of the plant were collected; air dried; pulverized and successively extracted using hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol by microwave assisted method. The phytochemical analysis of the leaf extracts of Anthocleista djalonensis revealed the presence of glycosides, saponins, terpenes, sterols flavonoids, anthraquinones, resins and balsams in Anthocleista djalonensis leaf. The antimicrobial screening of the hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol extracts were carried out on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin Resistant enterococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Helicobacter pylori, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using agar-well diffusion method. The antimicrobial studies showed that all the extracts exhibited activities against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin Resistant enterococci, S. aureus, H. pylori, C. albicans, and C. krusei with significant zones of inhibition ranging from 16 - 20 mm for hexane extract, 22 - 28 mm for ethyl acetate extract, 20 - 24 mm for ethanol extract and 20 - 23 mm for methanol extract against test microbes. E. coli, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis and C. tropicalis showed resistance to the extracts; Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extracts against the stated microbes were 5 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL, 2.5 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL respectively for hexane extract. 1.25 mg/mL, 1.25 mg/mL, 0.62 mg/mL, 0.62 mg/mL 0.62 mg/mL and 1.25 mg/mL respectively for ethyl acetate extract; Ethanol and methanol extracts recorded 1.25 mg/mL against all the stated test microbes. The minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration of the extracts against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin Resistant enterococci, S. aureus, H. pylori, C. albicans and C. krusei ranged from 5 mg/mL to 1.25 mg/mL. The results support the use of Anthocleista djalonensis in traditional medicine.
Keywords
Antimicrobial, Phytochemicals, Anthocleista djalonensis and Traditional Medicine
To cite this article
Ijeoma Solomon Okoro, Sampson Dominic Umoh, John Vershima Anyam, Manasseh Msugh-Ter Manyi, Cynthia Adegbe, In-vitro Antimicrobial Properties and Phytochemical Constituents of Anthocleista djalonensis Leaf Extracts, Journal of Drug Design and Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2017, pp. 71-76. doi: 10.11648/j.jddmc.20170305.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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